Fans of Tom Hardy will be overjoyed to hear they have not heard the last grunt from the enigmatic James Delaney.

A second series of his BBC One drama Taboo has been commissioned – thanks in part to its success on the BBC iPlayer.

Set in 19th Century London, the first series saw Hardy’s character return from Africa to claim an inheritance.

The actor, who conceived the show with his father Chips and writer Steven Knight, said its recommissioning was “fantastic news”.

“We are grateful and excited to continue our relationship with the BBC and FX in contributing towards British drama,” he added.

Jonathan Pryce played the sinister Sir Stuart Strange in the eight-part drama
The first series came to an end on 25 February and drew an average consolidated audience of 5.8 million – a figure reached after seven days that takes some catch-up viewing into account.

According to the BBC, though, the drama’s average audience was closer to 7 million, with viewers discovering it after that seven-day window.

Charlotte Moore, the BBC’s director of content, said Taboo “proves overnight ratings are not the only measure of success.”

“I’m thrilled that a work which pushes boundaries has been so well received,” said Knight, who produced the show with Tom and Sir Ridley Scott.

The first series of Taboo will remain on the iPlayer until 27 March.

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Asha
March 9, 2017

The actor created the new BBC miniseries with his father Chips and ‘Peaky Blinders’ creator Steven Knight

Tom Hardy has reportedly lost nearly £2 million from making his new BBC miniseries, Taboo.

Hardy’s new eight-part period drama, which follows the mysterious James Delaney’s (played by Hardy) return to London after many years in Africa to claim his father’s inheritance, was co-created by the actor’s father Chips and Peaky Blinder creator Steven Knight. It premiered in the UK on the BBC on January 7, and will run weekly on Saturday nights until February.

It has today been reported, however, that the company that Hardy founded – Taboo Productions Ltd – to handle the finances of making Taboo has recently reported a big loss. Accounts show that £10.4 million was spent on making Taboo, but its income only reached £8.4 million – an anonymous source told The Sun that “these new figures will make stark reading for Tom. No matter who you are or how much money you’re worth, £2 million is a lot of money to simply throw away.”

The source also said that Hardy hopes to reclaim some of the loss on future sales of DVDs and downloads, as well as syndication rights. Taboo currently airs in the US on FX, and has been sold around the world in countries such as Spain, Portugal and Russia.

Despite the financial losses, Taboo has been generally well-received by critics and audiences since its premiere, pulling in over 4 million viewers on the BBC for its January 14 episode.

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Asha
January 23, 2017

Created by Steven Knight with Tom Hardy and Chips Hardy, the drama series Taboo is set in 1814 and follows James Keziah Delaney (Tom Hardy), a man believed to be long dead. After returning home to London from Africa to inherit what’s left of his father’s shipping empire and rebuild a life for himself, he quickly learns just how poisoned his father’s legacy is, as he discovers enemies lurking everywhere. With conspiracy, murder and betrayal all around him, he must unravel a dark family mystery and hope to survive it.

While at the FX portion of the TCA Press Tour, Collider got the opportunity to speak with actor/series executive producer Tom Hardy, both during a 1-on-1 interview and after the show’s panel. Hardy talked about how this evolved from an idea for a character into a full-blown TV series, what he finds fascinating about James Delaney, how he approaches his characters, the complex relationship with Delaney’s half-sister, being aware of what was going on, every step of the way, and how he loves all mediums and genres. Be aware that there are some spoilers.

Question: When you came up with the idea for this character, and then you went to you dad with it and said that you wanted him to write this, did you think he would just say, “Sure, son, let me get right on that!”?

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Asha
January 22, 2017

Tom Hardy created, produced, and starred in a new series that’s about to premiere on FX. But what he’d really like to talk about is the purity of dogs.

“They’re just so clean and straightforward, and they wear their heart on their chest. You know what you’re getting with a dog.” He lets out a gruff, gleeful chuckle. “I love that. Unfettered companionship and loyalty in the most boring of manners. The life and the soul is right next to you, keeping the heart ticking over in the room. You know when a dog’s around, there’s good times. . . . It’s like, why would it choose to be around us? What the hell does it see in us? We don’t deserve them! What does it see in us that it’s so like, ‘Well, I wanna be with you, you’re awesome?’ I’m not that awesome. You’re awesome.”

Clearly, Hardy could discuss “doggies”—as he happily calls them between puffs of an e-cig, sitting with his legs slung over an armchair like a big kid in Santa’s lap—for ages. His love for man’s best friend is so well documented that fans have dedicated numerous social-media accounts to his obsession, sharing photos of him holding a surprisingly vast array of canines. “Bit random, innit?” he says in an interview with Vanity Fair. “I’m like the Pied Piper of Hamelin, with dogs.”

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Asha
January 11, 2017

Because you can raise hell *and* save the world, right?

Everyone knows that Tom Hardy is an actor, philanthropist and real-life superhero.

Anyway, the sex-God has spoken – and he’s not a fan of how “clean-living” the characters in modern-day superhero films are becoming, comparing the likes of Harrison Ford’s Indiana Jones in the ’80s to Chris Hemsworth’s Thor.

“One was allowed to express personal characteristics,” the 39-year-old actor told The Sunday Times newspaper.

“Now you’ve got to look like you’ve just come off a vegan diet, gone to the gym, part Navy Seal, really clean-valued, clean-living, moralistic – and then you go out and save the world from an impending danger that isn’t really dangerous at all.

“And it becomes not committed to any sense of the gubbins of reality: I don’t recognise this man.”

Of course, Tom played the villain Bane in The Dark Knight Rises, and was reportedly in line to play Rick Flag in Suicide Squad until a scheduling clash with The Revenant filming led to his exit from the superhero movie.

He recently opened up about his role in new show Taboo, telling the BBC that “it’s not a period drama until someone gets naked”.

“You’re lucky there was a loincloth because I didn’t want one,” he said.

“It’s not a period drama until someone gets naked and covers themselves in blood. At least you’re showing willing.”

The new show follows the story of James Delaney (Hardy), a traveller who everyone thought was dead until he returns to London in 1814 after spending 10 years in Africa to reclaim his father’s shipping empire.

The eight-episode series boasts a stellar cast including Jonathan Pryce, Oona Chaplin, David Hayman, Jessie Buckley and Jefferson Hall.

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Asha
January 9, 2017
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